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Belhaim

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Belhaim
A statue of Tula Belhaim, founder of Belhaim.
(City)
Nation Taldor
Size Small town
Population 388
Demographics 377 humans, 1 elf, 3 half-elves, 5 half-orcs, 1 halfling, 1 gnome
Government Overlord (Baroness)
Alignment Lawful neutral
Ruler Lady Origena Devy
Leader Arnholde Devy, Balthus Hunclay, Azmur Kell

Source: The Dragon's Demand, pg(s). 58-61

Belhaim is a small town located on a tributary of the Verduran Fork in the nation of Taldor's Verduran Forest.[1]

Geography

The Verduran Fork and Rogue Creek separate the different parts of the town. The main town is nestled between these two waterways. Roads with bridges cross the rivers and continue to the old limestone quarry, Faldamont, Wispil, and Old Fishing Holes.[2]

Government

The barony, including Belhaim, is ruled over by the Baroness Origena Devy. She is backed up by her son Arnholde Devy, the future baron.[3]

History

Belhaim was founded shortly after the Dragon Plague years of 3660 AR to 3672 AR, when Taldor's emperor gave Tula Belhaim the title of baroness in charge of the Verduran Fork which includes Dragonfen. This was due to her fighting prowess, where she led a group of prestigious dragonslayers. Those who followed her to this area quickly founded the town named after the baroness. Soon after, a group of monks of Irori built a monastery, the Monastery of Saint Kyerixus.[4]

After the baroness and her husband died, rule of the town fell to distant relations of her husband Arturic Canteclure. The Castle Tula was destroyed in 4500 AR when Baron Sarvo Canteclure joined a rebellion. It has since been called the Witch Tower, and was preceded by the disappearance of the monks. Sir Arkold Devy, one of those credited with bringing down Canteclure, was awarded the barony next, and his descendants have ruled since. Historically, the town has made its money from the limestone quarry, but an earthquake flooded the quarry. Now, people are looking for alternative locations to quarry valuable stone.[3]

References