Magic

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An oracle and a magus combine divine and arcane magic in combat.

Magic is a mysterious supernatural force used by many of Golarion's inhabitants. It is exhibited in many forms, including spells and magic items, and is applied in many ways, including arcane, divine, and psychic practices. Due to magic's many different forms, it is sometimes discussed as sorcery, witchcraft, witchery, or wizardry.[1]

Nature of magic

The true nature and source of magical power is unknown.[2]

Manifestations of magic

Magical power most often manifests as spells. In addition to spells and spellcasters, similar effects can manifest from magic items, potions, rituals, curses, and other powerful or unusual events.[3]

On spells

Oloch, Shardra, and Alahazra combine spells to fend off skeletons.

A spell is a one-time magical effect brought into being, or "cast", by a spellcaster. (Alchemists' extracts, while magical, are not "spells" in the technical sense.) Some spellcasters select their spells from a limited list of known spells, while others have access to a less limited array of options.

Most spellcasters prepare their spells in advance—whether from a spellbook or through prayers—while some cast spells spontaneously without preparation. Despite these different ways spellcasters learn or prepare spells, when it comes to casting them, many of the spells are very much alike, with magic being guided by certain core principles.[3]

Certain creatures, items, or abilities have a form of spell resistance can reduce or negate a spell's effects.[4][5]

Types of magic

There are three traditional types of magic that manifest in the form of spells: arcane, divine, and psychic magic. These types are not exclusive—spellcasters who combine arcane and divine magic, for example, are known as theurges. One such example is a mystic theurge.[6] A fourth type of magic exists, occult rituals, but it is generally practiced only by the desperate or the insane, as it is hard to control, and almost always has a significant drawback.[7]

Arcane magic

Arcane spells are known to create more dramatic and destructive effects than divine spells.[8][9] Unlike divine magic, many arcane magic spells require physical components, almost always in the form of either a reusable focus or consumable material component.[10]

Arcanists, bards, bloodragers, magi, skalds, sorcerers, summoners, witches, and wizards can all cast arcane spells, as can others who study the arts of spellcraft or have an innate talent for spellcasting.

Arcane magic is subject to the Laws of Arcana.[11]

Divine magic

Divine magic is derived from or granted by gods or other divine entities.[12]

Divine spellcasters include clerics, druids, inquisitors, oracles, shamans, warpriests, and experienced paladins and rangers.

Divine casters sometimes refer to their spells as prayers.[13]

Psychic magic

Psychic magic manifests from emotional and mental energies inherent in souls and auras.[14]

Occult rituals

Unlike the other three forms of magic, occult rituals can be practiced by the untrained and those who lack innate power. It is feared by most traditional spellcasters, as it is hard to control, can grant tremendous power, and can unleashed horrors upon the world.[7]

This section is a stub. You can help us by expanding it.

On Golarion

Magic is relatively well-known among the civilized races of the Inner Sea region, even if it is generally not a part of their everyday lives. Most commoners will have seen a spell or two cast in their time, seen the use of a magic item, or even been the beneficiary of healing magic. Despite this, most peasants do not count on magic to help them with their everyday lives, seeing it largely as a tool of the wealthy and powerful, a tool that can also be used against them. Because of its relative rarity, its capability of causing untold destruction, and its ability to accomplish the seemingly impossible, it inspires awe and fear in most folk and is often misunderstood.[15]

Schools of magic

Cutting across the categories of arcane and divine spells are the eight schools of magic. These schools represent the different ways that spells take effect.[16] Though magic has been practised since the dawn of history, it was in the time of Azlant and Thassilon that seven of the eight schools were first defined, in accordance with the seven Azlanti virtues of rule (with divination being defined later in history).[17][18][19]

These eight schools are:

Spells not bound to any specific school are known as universal spells, and wizards who do not specialize in any school are known as universalists.[20]

Metamagic

Metamagic, a practice of modifying or empowering spells that dates back to at least the Azlanti empire, remains a popular practice among modern spellcasters.[19]

This section is a stub. You can help us by expanding it.

Variant magic

Several styles of magic deviate from the established schools and methods. These alternate ways are known as variant magic, and many have strong links to specific cultures, locations, or races. Some known types of variant magic include:

References

  1. Dave Gross. (2013). King of Chaos, Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-558-7
  2. James Jacobs. (September 27, 2015). Comment on ">>Ask *James Jacobs* ALL your Questions Here!<<", Paizo messageboards. As such, there might not ever be a definitive, canonical explanation of magic. See the talk page for further discussion. Any canon theories about magic presented by in-world sources would be appropriate to add to this section, with the understanding that they cannot be definitive.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Jason Bulmahn. (2009). Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook, p. 206. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-150-3
  4. Jason Bulmahn. (2009). Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook, p. 217-218. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-150-3
  5. Paizo Staff. (2009). Pathfinder RPG Bestiary, p. 304. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-183-1
  6. Jason Bulmahn, et al. (2011). Ultimate Magic, p. 157. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-299-9
  7. 7.0 7.1 Jason Bulmahn et al. (2015). Occult Adventures, p. 208-215. Paizo Inc.
  8. Jason Bulmahn. (2009). Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook, p. 218. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-150-3
  9. Jason Bulmahn. (2009). Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook, p. 220. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-150-3
  10. Jason Bulmahn. (2009). Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook, p. 213. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-150-3
  11. Dave Gross. (2013). King of Chaos, p. 169. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-558-7
  12. Sean K Reynolds et al. (2014). Inner Sea Gods, p. 4-6. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-60125-597-6
  13. Liane Merciel. (2014). Nightblade, p. 146. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-60125-662-1
  14. Jason Bulmahn et al. (2015). Occult Adventures, p. 142. Paizo Inc.
  15. James Jacobs et al. (2011). The Inner Sea World Guide, p. 253. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-269-2
  16. Jason Bulmahn. (2009). Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook, p. 209. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-150-3
  17. James Jacobs et al. (2011). The Inner Sea World Guide, p. 211. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-269-2
  18. James Jacobs. (2012). The Shattered Star. Shards of Sin, p. 67. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-452-8
  19. 19.0 19.1 Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K. Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor. (2011). Inner Sea Magic, p. 9. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-360-6
  20. Jason Bulmahn. (2009). Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook, p. 79. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-150-3
  21. Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K. Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor. (2011). Inner Sea Magic, p. 10. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-360-6
  22. Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K. Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor. (2011). Inner Sea Magic, p. 11. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-360-6
  23. Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K. Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor. (2011). Inner Sea Magic, p. 12-13. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-360-6
  24. Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K. Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor. (2011). Inner Sea Magic, p. 14. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-360-6
  25. Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K. Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor. (2011). Inner Sea Magic, p. 15. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-360-6
  26. Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K. Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor. (2011). Inner Sea Magic, p. 17. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-360-6
  27. Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K. Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor. (2011). Inner Sea Magic, p. 16. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-360-6