Jarguut

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Jarguut
(Person)
Aliases Jarguut the Weak, the Unready, the Last
Titles King of Raemerrund
Race/Species Human (Ulfen)
Gender Male
Homeland Raemerrund, Lands of the Linnorm Kings (now Irrisen)
Died 3313 AR

Source: Lands of the Linnorm Kings, pg(s). 2

King Jarguut was the last ruler of the Linnorm Kingdom of Raemerrund, located to the east of the Iceflow in what today is the nation of the White Witches, Irrisen. Considered more studious than martial, Jarguut was helpless when his kingdom was invaded in 3313 AR by the armies of the witch queen Baba Yaga.[1][2]

History

Jarguut took the throne of Raemerrund in 3298 AR upon the death of his father, King Ethered. A bookish type, Jarguut had not slain a linnorm and surprised the thanes of his kingdom by refusing to go on the hunt after his coronation. Although not a necessary requirement of the office, the rulers of the Linnorm Kingdoms had always slain such a beast in a tradition going back nearly 4,000 years to the first Linnorm King, Saebjorn Arm-Fang.[2][3]

King Jarguut's refusal did not sit well with a number of the more powerful thanes of his land, who demanded to be given independence. As Jarguut was incapable of bringing them back under his control, the thanes declared the birth of the Djurstor Confederacy in 3304 AR.[2]

When the forces of Baba Yaga invaded from the north in the Winter War of 3313 AR, King Jarguut and the bickering thanes of the Djurstor Confederacy could not mount a coordinated defense. Their territories were quickly overrun by the Witch Queen's forces, Raemerrund falling in six days and the Confederacy capitulating 17 days after that.[1][2]

Personality

Although King Jarguut's lack of martial prowess hastened the fall of his kingdom during the Winter War (even if it is doubtful if anyone could have stood against the forces of Baba Yaga for long), he was not altogether a bad king. His scholarly, introspective nature made him a deliberative, wise ruler who simply had the wrong attributes for his moment in history.[4]

References