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Peacock Spirit

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Peacock Spirit
(Deity)
Areas of Concern Mind, body, soul
Worshipers Mages, scholars, aesthetics

The mysterious deity known only as the Peacock Spirit had much to do with the rise of the empire of Thassilon. A god or goddess of indeterminate gender, it was worshiped by scholars and researchers of rune magic. Its symbol, a large peacock feather with an open eye, adorned the thrones of the early emperors.[1] The worship of the Peacock Spirit ended with the decline of ancient Thassilon,[2] and does not seem to have returned in the last few thousand years.[3]

Church of the Peacock Spirit

The Peacock Spirit was known to have been a mysterious religion. Even in its heyday at the height of Thassilonian Power, little of its dogma was understood by those outside the church, and so even less can be inferred by modern scholars.[1] It is said that in ancient times, the inner circle of its most-devout worshipers knew the deity's true name.[4] The runelord Xanderghul was said to have been an open devotee of the Peacock Spirit (the only runelord to do so),[5] and it was also popular in the domain of Haruka before the rise of the Runelord Krune, who preferred the church of Lissala.[6]

Temples, monasteries, & followers

The Peacock Spirit was served by an ascetic order of monks, many of whom built monasteries on the Storval Plateau in the ancient domain of Shalast.[7] The Peacock Spirit also sponsored an order of knights known as the Order of the Green Feather,[1] and some believe that the contemporary Monks of the White Feather in Qadira secretly worship the deity as well.[8]

Holy texts & artifacts

Emerald Codex of the Therassic Order
A collection of spells and rituals devoted to the Peacock Spirit, penned by the Therassic Order. One known copy of the text was written on wyvern hide, and consisted of 18 scrolls.[10]
Revelation Quill
Originally created by worshipers of the deity from a peacock feather, this quill is said to still be tied to the power of the Peacock Spirit. When properly used, it can answer questions posed to it, leading some to believe that the Thassilonian deity might not be completely dead.[14]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Wolfgang Baur. (2007). The History of Thassilon. Burnt Offerings, p. 78. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-035-3
  2. Rob McCreary. (2010). The Godsmouth Heresy, p. 6. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-280-7
  3. James Jacobs et al. (2011). The Inner Sea World Guide, p. 235. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-269-2
  4. Wolfgang Baur. (2007). Fortress of the Stone Giants. Fortress of the Stone Giants, p. 41. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-039-1
  5. Mike Shel. (2012). Curse of the Lady's Light. Curse of the Lady's Light, p. 46. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-459-7
  6. Brandon Hodge. (2013). The Dead Heart of Xin. The Dead Heart of Xin, p. 72, 74. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-491-7
  7. Wolfgang Baur. (2007). The History of Thassilon. Burnt Offerings, p. 75. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-035-3
  8. Brian Cortijo. (2009). Qadira, Gateway to the East, p. 23. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-180-0
  9. Wolfgang Baur. (2007). Fortress of the Stone Giants. Fortress of the Stone Giants, p. 25. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-039-1
  10. 10.0 10.1 Wolfgang Baur. (2007). Fortress of the Stone Giants. Fortress of the Stone Giants, p. 27-28. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-039-1
  11. Tyler Beck, Jason Garrett, Alex Greenshields, and David Schwartz. (2014). Belkzen, Hold of the Orc Hordes, p. 12-13. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-60125-710-9
  12. James L. Sutter. (2010). City of Strangers, p. 18. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-248-7
  13. Greg A. Vaughan. (2008). Spires of Xin-Shalast. Spires of Xin-Shalast, p. 30. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-041-4
  14. Stephen S. Greer. (2008). Sins of the Saviors. Sins of the Saviors, p. 17. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-040-7