Johud

From PathfinderWiki
Johud
(Organization)
Type Clan
Leader Glungur
Alignment Chaotic evil
Headquarters Dyinglight,
Worldwound
Scope Local
Structure Tribal

Source: Campaign Setting, pg(s). 149

The Johud are a clan of fiendish marsh giants who rule the abandoned city of Dyinglight in the Frostmire region of the Worldwound. They are devout (if somewhat primitive) worshipers of the demon lord Kostchtchie, and are led by their high priest, Glungur.[1][2]

History

A clan of marsh giants dwelled for eons in the Frostmire Fen, a large wetland in the northwestern part of Sarkoris. Although they were hunted by the local Kellid humans, the giant population could never be eradicated completely. When the Worldwound opened in 4606 AR releasing hordes of demons, the humans abandoned the nearby city of Dyinglight, leaving many of their belongings behind. Despite this tempting target, the giants of the Fen did not approach the city, fearing it was another human trick. A small group of frost giants under the leadership of the visionary Jarl Bjorvesh entered Sarkoris, lured there by the demonic incursion, and quickly took the city. When the marsh giants saw this, they realized that the humans were truly gone for good, and descended upon Dyinglight, overwhelming the frost giants with their greater numbers. When Jarl Bjorvesh fell, he immediately rose from the dead, congratulating the marsh giants on their victory, but informing them that they now had to establish a giant kingdom there in honor of Kostchtchie. They immediately dedicated themselves to the demon lord and have claimed the city every since. Within a generation, the marsh giants began seeing fiendish deformities in their offspring, and soon the entire population was wholly tainted, remembering their previous existence only as legend.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 James Jacobs, Jonathan H. Keith, Jason Nelson, Amber Stewart, and Tanith Tyrr. (2013). The Worldwound, p. 7. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-532-7
  2. Erik Mona et al. (2008). Campaign Setting, p. 149. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-112-1