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Caryatid column

From PathfinderWiki
Caryatid column
Representations of caryatid columns.
(Creature)
Type Construct
CR 3
Environment Any
Alignment
Images of caryatid columns

Source: Bonus Bestiary, pg(s). 8

Crafted from a single piece of exquisite stone, caryatid columns are magical constructs often created to guard valuable objects or areas. While not as potent as golems, they are still formidable opponents.[1]

Appearance

A caryatid column is an ornate column carved in the shape of a warrior, normally mounted on a plinth and with a plinth to support the roof above atop it. The column itself is carved into the form of a shapely humanoid warrior, normally a female, who stands motionless with her hands rested on a sword or other similar weapon. The first sign that a caryatid column is not just a normal column is often its first attack.[1]

Habitat and ecology

Caryatid columns are found wherever a wizard needs something protected. They are often used in lieu of a more powerful construct either because the creator does not feel a stronger construct is necessary or due to a lack of power or resources to create one. Due to the relative cheapness of their construction, caryatid columns are often found in large numbers. When they are created they are given a specific command about what they are to protect and from whom to protect it (and whom they allow to pass). This is one of their biggest weaknesses since caryatid columns lack the magical sight of more expensive constructs, meaning a clever disguise or invisibility can allow someone to bypass them.[1] Caryatid columns have been spotted in large numbers in locations as diverse as the crypts below Korvosa's Grey District,[2] the elven ruins of Celwynvian,[3] and the treasure vault of Tabsagal in Ninshabur.[4]

Abilities

Caryatid columns stand so still that it is easy to mistake them for statues. Like more powerful golems, they are almost completely immune to magic. Due to their construction of solid marble, any weapon that strikes a caryatid column with enough force to damage it often itself breaks or shatters.[1]

References