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Forlarren

From PathfinderWiki
Forlarren
(Creature)
Type Fey
CR 2
Environment Temperate forests and plains
Alignment
Adjective forlarren

Source: Bestiary 2, pg(s). 125

Forlarrens are a rare result of interbreeding between a nymph and a fiend.[1]

Appearance

Forlarrens are humanoid fey with curved horns upon their heads, completely hairless bodies, and legs shaped like those of a goat. Most are 6 feet tall and weigh about 160 pounds.[1]

Ecology

While the (generally non-consensual) union between a nymph and a fiend typically results in the birth of a half-fiend, about one in 20 such incidents can instead lead to the birth of a forlarren, a unique creature distinguishable from either nymphs, fiends, or half-fiends. Most nymph mothers die while giving birth to a forlarren, and those who survive and attempt to raise the child in a loving environment are often faced with the forlarren's inherent evil, which typically only leads them to resent and eventually murder their own mother.

Forlarrens reach adulthood in only a single year, and can theoretically live for centuries. However, due to their violent lives most perish before they turn 10. Most are female, and only a few are capable of conceiving children of their own.[1]

Society

Forlarrens are cast out from both fey and fiendish society, which leads to a lonely life spent consumed by hatred of all around them, including themselves. They manifest this anger in single-minded, violent aggression toward others, but should they kill another living creature, their nymph heritage can inspire overwhelming, almost nauseating amounts of remorse. Their erratic behavior makes befriending a forlarren difficult, even for others of their own kind.[1]

Ability

Like many fey, forlarrens have a natural resilience against weapons not made of cold iron, but they share few other traits with their nymph mothers. Instead, they generally have magical spell-like abilities linked to their fiendish fathers.[1]

Forlarrens generally speak Taldane and Sylvan languages.[1]

References