Noor

From PathfinderWiki
Noor
(Person)
Titles Red Sultana
Race/Species Gnoll
Gender Female
Homeland Katapesh
Organization White Canyon tribe

Source: Dark Markets, pg(s). 24-25

Noor, the Red Sultana is a female gnoll who leads the most violent and sadistic faction within the White Canyon tribe in Katapesh.[1]

History

Noor gained her title in 4701 AR, during the Siege of Solku where she fought next to Rath Sandstalker at the head of his small army of gnolls. After the gnolls failed to hold Solku, Noor left the band of survivors and disappeared into the desert. When Noor reappeared, she did so as the Red Sultana with enchanted hide armor that shone with a slick red sheen as if dripping wet with crimson gore, and her eyes burn with an intense light. The Red Sultana drew to her crimson banner the most depraved, sadistic, desperate and violent gnolls in the region. Sandstalker lost some of his tribe, others came from small packs in the mountains. She cares nothing for preserving or defending gnoll settlements, nor does she march for gold or power. She cares only for slaughter and seeks to begin it with those who resisted her last siege on Solku.[1]

A rumor exists that Noor was saved during the Siege of Solku by a band of depraved adventurers known as the Marrow Reavers. Others claim that the Marrow Reavers found her dead body and brought it back to life, and that it was this rebirth that brought about her change. Whatever the truth might be, neither the Red Sultana or the or the Marrow Reavers speak a word of it.[2]

Current Status

It is rumoured that she is currently attempting to unite the gnolls of White Canyon under her banner with the intention of assailing the city of Solku again before sweeping down upon the rest of Katapesh.[3]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Stephen S. Greer & Amber E. Scott. (2009). Dark Markets: A Guide to Katapesh, p. 24–25. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-166-4
  2. Brandon Hodge, Colin McComb, Jason Nelson. (2011). Rival Guide, p. 40. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-302-6
  3. James Jacobs et al. (2011). The Inner Sea World Guide, p. 93. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-269-2