Consonite choir

From PathfinderWiki
Consonite choir
(Creature)
Uncommon
Gargantuan
Level 13
Alignment

Source: Bestiary 3, pg(s). 53

Consonite choirs are earth elementals made of razor-sharp crystalline blades who have reached a collective consciousness. Consonite choirs are known for their beautiful resonant music.[1]

Appearance

Each constituent member of a consonite choir is a long, sharp clear crystal shard. The shards swarm together only after a sufficient number of the crystals harmonize their songs, at which point the collective creature may detach from its cavernous home on the Plane of Earth and fly about the plane or elsewhere.[1]

Abilities

The hallmark ability of a consonite choir is its resonation. Through the combined song of the consonite choir, the creature can both augment its allies' attacks by causing a given weapon to resonate and deal additional damage, or the consonite choir can damage enemies directly by surrounding them with tremendous noise. The razor-sharp nature of the crystals also allows it to slice enemies by just moving into them. The consonite choir can also briefly shoot out constituent members as a sort of javelin or lance.[1]

Ecology

Consonite choirs originate exclusively from the Plane of Earth, where the creatures are just one kind of crystalline being to grow in the infinite caverns of that plane. The individual shards grow without any provocation and resonate with the grinding and shifting of the Plane. Initially without sentience, consonite choirs' music holds a sort of collective magic that allows groups growing near each other to eventually gain awareness and intelligence through song.[1]

Consonite choirs typically enjoy traveling the planes, as the open spaces of most destination planes allows greater airflow through their shards and creates different and unique aeolian opportunities; destinations like the Material Plane allow possible collaboration with any number of musicians. Unfortunately, outside of the Plane of Earth, the consonite choir often finds it much more difficult to replace its constituent parts as they naturally break down and chip away.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Logan Bonner, et al. (2021). Bestiary 3 (Second Edition), p. 53. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-64078-312-6