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Ivory Labyrinth

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Ivory Labyrinth
The rune of Baphomet.
(Abyssal realm)
Ruler Baphomet
Denizens Minotaurs, secret societies
Description Endless maze of minotaurs

Source: Lords of Chaos, Book of the Damned Volume 2, pg(s). 12, 40

The Ivory Labyrinth is the Abyssal realm of the demon lord Baphomet.[1]

History

Baphomet was originally imprisoned in the Ivory Labyrinth by Asmodeus for attempting to steal the Prince of Darkness's ruby scepter. Asmodeus claimed the maze was unsolvable, but the wily and cunning Baphomet escaped it after only 10 years. With his escape, thinner but wiser, the Lord of Minotaurs fled Hell with the Labyrinth in tow, and it rapidly became the demon lord's personal demesne.[2]

In honor of their patron's realm, mortal cults of Baphomet refer to themselves as Templars of the Ivory Labyrinth.[3]

Description

The first maze always encountered by visitors is the namesake Ivory Maze; the walls, ceilings, and floors of the hallways and chambers of this section are entirely covered with uncountable bones of every description. Beyond it, the realm is easily as large as some planets, and employs confusing twists of all sorts of architecture, geography, and metaphysics. Explorers have reported that its many treacherous terrains include cities' worth of tightly packed streets, entire mountain ranges criss-crossed with winding paths, plains with jagged protrusions of bones, vast warrens of underground tunnels, impassible swamps, twisted rivers, and impenetrable forests.[2]

Inhabitants

The realm is populated by minotaurs and demons of all sorts.[4] An array of demonic secret societies—in addition to Baphomet's cult—also have headquarters here, each paying homage to its master. Damned souls also wander the labyrinth eternally, being slain and reforming in an endless cycle of torment.[5] Vilsteth demons also take shape in the depths of the Ivory Labyrinth, birthed from the essence of the Labyrinth itself, combined with the souls of those who abused positions of authority during their mortal lives.[6]

Specific inhabitants

References