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Knights of Ozem

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Knights of Lastwall
Symbol of the Knights of Lastwall
(Organization)
Type Military & Religious
Alignment Chaotic good, Lawful good
Headquarters Decentralized
(temporary camps)
Goals Reclaim and rebuild Lastwall
Destroy Tar-Baphon
Protect Avistan from undead
Scope Regional
Structure Military
Members Avalorex, Clarethe Iomedar, Watcher-Lord Ulthun II

Source: Lost Omens Character Guide, pg(s). 86-95

The Knights of Ozem were a military order dedicated to the goddess Iomedae based in Lastwall's capital of Vigil. They first rose to prominence when they helped defeat the Whispering Tyrant during the Shining Crusade in the 39th century AR.[1][2][3] After Tar-Baphon escaped his imprisonment and laid waste to Lastwall in 4719 AR, the few surviving Knights of Ozem who survived that onslaught rededicated themselves to helping Lastwall's remaining citizens escape and finally ending the lich-king's life and renamed themselves the Knights of Lastwall.[4]

History

Shining Crusade

The Knights of Ozem found their true calling during the Shining Crusade in the late 39th century AR. They joined with the armies of the Empire of Taldor and the dwarves of the kingdom of Kraggodan to bring down the Whispering Tyrant and liberate Ustalav and much of central Avistan from his clutches.[5][6] The Knights were led by the mortal Iomedae, and held the goddess Arazni (then the herald of Aroden) as their patron saint.[1] The Knights summoned Arazni to aid them in the siege of Gallowspire in 3818 AR,[7] and she continued doing so for five years. She was finally humiliated and slain by the Whispering Tyrant himself in 3823 AR, thoroughly shaking the faith of the Knights.[8][9] The entire crusade was thrown back by this terrible defeat, until Iomedae rallied the Knights and initiated a counterstrike that halted the undead legion's advance, and completely destroyed their vanguard at the battle of Vaishali Pass.[10] Unwilling to give up their patron to the enemy, the Knights attempted to recover Arazni's corpse, eventually doing so at the Battle of Three Sorrows where Iomedae battled Erum-Hel, Lord of the Mohrgs.[1] Arazni was laid to rest in the crusader's keep, which would form the foundation for the settlement of Vigil several years later.[10][11] When the Shining Crusade finally defeated and imprisoned the Whispering Tyrant within his own fortress of Gallowspire in 3827 AR, the Knights helped to create the many wards that would keep him imprisoned (especially the Great Seal), and dedicated themselves to making sure his evil would never plague Golarion again. In order to achieve this, they helped found the nation of Lastwall.[5][12]

Assault on Geb

In times of relative peace, soldiers often long for the glories of battle; this was sadly also true for the Knights of Ozem. Even though they continued patrolling the Ustalavic county of Virlych, rooting out evil and guarding against the return of Tar-Baphon, successive generations of Knights idolized the warriors who had fought in the Shining Crusade, and wished they had their own undead menace to vanquish. Not finding anything of sufficient stature in central Avistan, they turned their gaze southward and decided to attempt to bring down the rule of Geb, the undead ruler of the Garundi land bearing his name. Commander Claidius Barronmor launched a poorly planned infiltration of the nation in 3889 AR, sending six knights, including his own grandson, Amaretos; the other five knights were Seldeg Bhedlis, Gustari Fallenstag, Tycha Ghuzmaar, Ammar Ilverazto, Yhalas. The mission ended in total failure, and Geb himself was so annoyed at the Knights' arrogance, that he reanimated the fallen Ozemites as graveknights and sent them back to Lastwall on a special mission. They broke into the vault holding Arazni's body and stole it, taking it back with them to Geb. Unwilling to give up their patron's remains, the Knights launched an ultimately unsuccessful counter-offensive back into Geb, only to discover to their horror that Geb had re-animated Arazni's corpse as a lich, naming her his Harlot Queen, an affront which the knights have never forgiven.[13][8][14]

Bloodstones of Arazni

The Knights claim that some of Arazni's organs were removed before her reanimation and put in special canopic jars known as the Bloodstones of Arazni. They claim that these holy relics are still able to exert some control over the Harlot Queen, but have been unable or unwilling to do so. Arazni herself seems to believe this to be true, and continues supporting efforts to find and destroy them. What is certain is that the jars are powerful magical artifacts linked not only to the formerly divine power of Arazni, but also to that of her patron, Aroden.[8][14]

Fall of Lastwall

In 4719 AR, Lastwall fell to the forces of the newly-freed Whispering Tyrant, becoming the undead-haunted wasteland known as the Gravelands. The Knights of Ozem rebranded themselves as the Knights of Lastwall and have continued to fight the tide of undead, despite overwhelming odds.[15]

Organization

After the death of Arazni and the ascension of Iomedae in 3823 AR,[9] the knights adopted their former commander as their patron god, one of many knightly orders to do so. They referred to her as the "Light of the Sword", which recalled her holy symbol of a longsword wreathed in a burst of light.[1] In respect for their patron, commanders carried flame tongues and frost brands, and many of the lesser ranks have continual flame or light spells cast on their blades.[16]

Since the fall of Lastwall and the loss of their headquarters in Vigil, members of the Knights of Lastwall now only meet in temporary camps or councils to discuss strategy.[17]

Members

Known Knights of Ozem included Commander Andabar Cerban, who recently disappeared under mysterious circumstances,[18] the siblings Ennis and Keren Rhinn,[19] as well as members of the famous Tilernos family of Lastwall.[20] Since their rededication, the most prominent Knights of Lastwall include Avalorex, the mysterious soothsayer, Clarethe Iomedar, and Watcher-Lord Ulthun II, former leader of Lastwall.[17]

Mission

The Knights of Ozem's mission was to monitor Gallowspire and the Hungry Mountains to guard against any possible return of Tar-Baphon, to destroy undead, and to cast back the demons of Worldwound.[2] Smaller squadrons had first priority to reclaim or destroy the Harlot Queen, and set up camps around Geb to spy on the country of the unliving.[16]

The goals of the Knights of Lastwall now revolve around the reclamation and rebuilding of Lastwall. Secondary objectives include the ultimate destruction of Tar-Baphon and his minions, and to a lesser extent, protecting the Inner Sea region from undead in general.[17]

Dress

Knights of Ozem were seldom seen without their armor, always decorated with the flaming sword symbol of their patroness, Iomedae.[21][22] Their usual method of fighting is with a sword and a shield in memory of the fighting style of both Iomedae and Aroden.[23]

References

For additional resources, see the Meta page.

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Sean K Reynolds. (2009). Iomedae. The Sixfold Trial, p. 66–68. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-196-1
  2. 2.0 2.1 Dennis Baker et al. (2014). Undead Slayer's Handbook, p. 5. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-60125-604-1
  3. Alexander Augunas and David N. Ross. (2015). Weapon Master's Handbook, p. 22. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-60125-796-3
  4. John Compton et al. (2019). Lost Omens Character Guide, p. 86. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-64078-193-1
  5. 5.0 5.1 Erik Mona et al. (2008). Campaign Setting, p. 90–91. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-112-1
  6. Gareth Hanrahan, Steve Kenson, Patrick Renie, Tork Shaw, and Jerome Virnich. (2012). Knights of the Inner Sea, p. 10. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-460-3
  7. Erik Mona et al. (2008). Campaign Setting, p. 202. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-112-1
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Adam Daigle. (2011). Liches of Golarion. Shadows of Gallowspire, p. 70. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-313-2
  9. 9.0 9.1 James Jacobs et al. (2011). The Inner Sea World Guide, p. 36. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-269-2
  10. 10.0 10.1 Jason Nelson. (2009). Vigil. Cities of Golarion, p. 45. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-200-5
  11. Sean K Reynolds. (2008). Gods and Magic, p. 53. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-139-8
  12. Jason Bulmahn. (2011). Gallowspire. Dungeons of Golarion, p. 15–18. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-304-0
  13. Erik Mona et al. (2008). Campaign Setting, p. 76–77. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-112-1
  14. 14.0 14.1 F. Wesley Schneider. (2012). Artifacts & Legends, p. 13. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-458-0
  15. Tanya DePass, James Jacobs, Lyz Liddell, et al. (2019). Lost Omens World Guide, p. 41. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-64078-172-6
  16. 16.0 16.1 Colin McComb. (2011). Faiths of Purity, p. 23. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-314-9
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 John Compton et al. (2019). Lost Omens Character Guide, p. 88. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-64078-193-1
  18. Richard Pett. (2012). The Moonscar, p. 4. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-426-9
  19. Gabrielle Harbowy. (2013). "Inheritance", Paizo Publishing, LLC.
  20. Gareth Hanrahan, Steve Kenson, Patrick Renie, Tork Shaw, and Jerome Virnich. (2012). Knights of the Inner Sea, p. front inside cover. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-460-3
  21. James Jacobs et al. (2011). The Inner Sea World Guide, p. 101. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-269-2
  22. Brandon Hodge. (2011). Shadows of Gallowspire. Shadows of Gallowspire, p. 13. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-60125-313-2
  23. Alexander Augunas and David N. Ross. (2015). Weapon Master's Handbook, p. 4. Paizo Inc. ISBN 978-1-60125-796-3