PathfinderWiki
Log in

Sech Nevali

From PathfinderWiki

Sech Nevali is a relic from the Thassilonian realm of Haruka. Also called the Hanging Monastery, it is a vast stone temple complex built upon a very thick metal platform suspended over a mile-deep chasm by three immense chains attached to three nearby mountain peaks. A fourth chain failed centuries ago, making the monastery sway disconcertingly in strong winds.[1]

History

Sech Nevali was commissioned in -6335 AR by the runelord of sloth Xirie. Its construction took 180 years and was performed by the Therassic Order, a Thassilonian society of wizard-monks dedicated to the Peacock Spirit. The monastery was protected by a group of knights from the Order of the Green Feather.[2]

In 4670 AR, Nirmathi explorers looking for a safe route to Varisia rediscovered Sech Nevali by accident. In 4673 AR, about 40 adventurous scholars from Almas University and the University of Korvosa established a hidden research station here. They quickly discovered that the outer chambers were empty but the central chambers were protected by complex magical locks and guarded by powerful graveknights. They also realized that as long as they did not try to access the central chambers, the graveknights would not attack them. The scholars converted the outer rooms to study and living quarters, built a small pulley system to transport food and personnel to and from the monastery and even brought tons of dirt to plant small gardens in the rooms that are open to the sky.[1]

Inhabitants

Only a dozen of these former scholars remain in the monastery, and are divided into two rival groups. Both groups have adopted the dress and name of the monastery's former occupants and worship the Peacock Spirit. The leader of the first camp is the quirky Milithus of Cassomir while the leader of the second camp is the elf wizard Ariannelle.[1]

The orders of secretive, isolationist monks correctly believe that not even orcs would brave the most treacherous mountains in the Hold of Belkzen to disturb their solitude. Yet what their ultimate purpose could be in such a remote and inhospitable place remains a mystery beyond Sech Nevali's swaying walls.[3][1]

References