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Brinewall

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Brinewall
(City)
Nation New Thassilon
Region Eurythnia

Source: The Brinewall Legacy, pg(s). 24ff.

Brinewall was an abandoned settlement and castle (see Brinewall Castle) built during the early part of the Chelish expansion into Varisia (see Everwar). Situated in northwestern Varisia where the Steam River flows into the Bunyip Bay,[1] it was designed to encourage trade with, and fend off attacks from, raiders of the Lands of the Linnorm Kings.[2] Recently, it gained a new lease of life as a port in the new kingdom of Eurythnia in New Thassilon.[3]

History

Construction on Brinewall Castle began in 4442 AR, but quickly ran into troubles. It was plagued by funding problems and building delays, and was not completed until 4469 AR.[4] The militia who patrolled Brinewall defended their keep remarkably until 4687 AR. The Frozen Shadows overran Brinewall, killing the entire population in less than an hour, but leaving most buildings intact. Their involvement was never discovered, and plenty of blame was passed around.[2][5]

Blame has mostly fallen on the Nolander barbarians, who were a constant menace to the settlement. Curiously however, the Nolanders themselves avoid the place, fearing it as cursed.[6]

New Thassilon

After the founding of New Thassilon in 4718 AR,[7] Queen Sorshen annexed Brinewall along with the rest of the Nolands. Under her rule, Brinewall quickly became a thriving port town.[3]

References