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Alika Epakena

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Alika Epakena
(Person)
Titles Saint Alika the Martyr
Seer of Pharasma
Race/Species Human
Gender Female
Homeland Korvosa, Varisia
Deity Pharasma
Born 4408 AR
Died 4429 AR (age 21)

Source: Guide to Korvosa, pg(s). 19

Alika Epakena, also known as Saint Alika or Saint Alika the Martyr, was a famous resident of Korvosa in its earliest days, and due to her many reported oracular powers, was canonized after her death.[1]

History

She was the first child born in 4408 AR in Fort Korvosa, as the settlement was then known. Gifted by Pharasma with potent seer abilities, she augmented this ability later in life by learning to read Varisian Harrow cards. Her skill at prognostication helped protect the early settlers from otherwise unpredictable Shoanti raids.[1]

The Great Fire

Alika foresaw the Great Fire that ravaged Korvosa in 4429 AR. She also foresaw her own death during the fire, but despite this, heroically helped to put it out, even though she was killed in the process.[1] She was luckily able to warn Lord Magistrate Endrin (the city's ruler at the time) about the upcoming fire, who took the news to the Chelish crown, who in turn sent a flotilla of ships. Although these additional troops arrived too late to save the city from the fire, their presence did deter the hostile Shoanti warriors, who would have otherwise taken advantage of Korvosa's weakened condition.[2]

Canonization

She was posthumously sainted by the church of Aroden; supposedly the herald of Aroden at the time, Iomedae, herself appeared to declare her canonization.[1] She was buried in Korvosa, and her remains are now kept within a secure ossuary underneath the Grand Cathedral of Pharasma in the Gray district.[3]

Naming

Several places in Korvosa are named in her honour, most famously the Narrows of Saint Alika,[1] and her journals are still kept in the Jeggare Library of the University of Korvosa in a secured vault.[4] Her birthday on the 31st of Arodus is celebrated in Korvosa as a day of contemplative reflection.[5]

References